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[CATATAN HARIAN SAYA] #MenulisAdalahMelawan #MenulisAdalahPembebasan - Yose Rizal Triarto - Yogyakarta, 20 November 2017.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

University of Pennsylvania English for Media Literacy Statement of Accomplishment


Thank you so much for the opportunity and knowledge, dear American English at State, University of Pennsylvania and U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs. I have completed English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania for FREE.

Grade Achieved: 100.0%.

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Statement of Accomplishment

U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs
University of Pennsylvania
American English at State

Congratulations!

You have completed English for Media Literacy from the University of Pennsylvania

Ian Nichols
Language Specialist
English Language Programs

Lauren Fiori
Advising Specialist
English Language Programs

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English for Media Literacy
University of Pennsylvania

About this Course

Welcome to English for Media Literacy, a course created by the University of Pennsylvania, and funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs.

This course is designed for non-native English speakers who are interested in learning more about U.S. media literacy. In this course, you will explore different types of mass media; such as, newspapers, magazines, television, and social media. This course will also give you the opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the role media plays in our lives, while building your vocabulary and giving you the language skills needed to analyze what you read and watch. The first unit in this course will provide an introduction to media literacy and give you an opportunity to evaluate your own media literacy level. In unit 2, you will learn how to identify facts versus opinions in the media. The next unit in the course will focus on the differences between social media and traditional media, while unit 4 will look at how gender and identity are covered in the media. In the final unit of the course, you will demonstrate your increased media literacy by through a culminating final project on social media.

Anyone may take this course for free and get a Statement of Accomplishment issued by the University of Pennsylvania. If you want to get a Coursera Verified Certificate for free, please fill out the Financial Aid form.

Development of this course was funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Office of English Language Programs. Unless otherwise noted, all course materials are available for re-use, repurposing and free distribution under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution license.

Taught by: Lauren Fiori, Advising Specialist
English Language Programs
Taught by: Ian Nichols, Language Specialist
English Language Programs

Language:    English (Volunteer to translate subtitles for this course)
How To Pass:    Pass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings:    Average User Rating 4.8

Syllabus

WEEK 1
Unit 1: Introduction to Media Literacy
In this unit, you will learn what media literacy means and how you can improve your own media literacy skills.
11 videos, 8 readings, 7 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: William Cowen Interview
Graded: Assessment 1: Self-Assessment of Media Literacy Skills
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Can you Separate Fact from Fiction?"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Debate over Free Press in Ukraine Suffers from Old Stereotypes"

WEEK 2
Unit 2: Types of Media: Traditional vs. Social
In this unit you will learn about the differences between traditional and social media, and learn the language necessary to compare them.
11 videos, 8 readings, 8 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Study Finds Most Americans Get News from Social Media"
Graded: Assessment 1: Compare Traditional and Social Media
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "5 Ways Social Media Helps Syrian Refugees"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Real or Not? Snowboarder's Video in Question"

WEEK 3
Unit 3: Advertising
In this unit, you will learn how advertisers use media to market their products.
13 videos, 9 readings, 6 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: Interview with Nancy Bollinger
Graded: Assessment 1: Advertising, thinking critically about ads, and targeting audiences
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Internet Ads Outpace Print for First Time"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Advertisers Join the Search for Friends Online"
Graded: Unit 3 Assessment 2 (Option 1): Recorded Analysis of an Advertisement

WEEK 4
Bias in the Media
In this unit, we will discuss the meaning of media bias and several common types of bias.
12 videos, 9 readings, 7 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "For the Press, Elections are a Test of Accountability"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Are Facebook’s Trending Topics Unfair?"
Graded: Unit 4 Assessment 2: Media Bias (recorded option)

WEEK 5
Diversity and the Media
In this unit, we will learn about the importance of including people from various races, cultures, and genders in mainstream media.
11 videos, 10 readings, 6 practice quizzes:
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Minorities See Improvement, Demand more Diversity on US Television"
Graded: Unit 5 Assessment 1: True or False: Media Diversity
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Native Americans Take Control of Their Story"
Graded: Check Your Understanding: "Social Media Highlights Sexism in Olympics Coverage"
Graded: Unit 5 Assessment 2: How Different Groups are Depicted in the Media

How It Works

GENERAL

How do I pass the course?
To earn your Course Certificate, you’ll need to earn a passing grade on each of the required assignments—these can be quizzes, peer-graded assignments, or programming assignments. Videos, readings, and practice exercises are there to help you prepare for the graded assignments.

What do start dates and end dates mean?
Most courses have sessions that run multiple times a year — each with a specific start and end date. Once you enroll, you’ll have access to all videos, readings, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer-graded assignments can only be submitted and reviewed once your session has begun. If you choose to explore the course without purchasing, you may not be able to access certain assignments. If you don’t finish all graded assignments before the end of the session, you can enroll in the next session. Your progress will be saved and you’ll be able to pick up where you left off when the next session begins.

What are due dates? Is there a penalty for submitting my work after a due date?
Within each session there are suggested due dates to help you manage your schedule and keep coursework from piling up. Quizzes and programming assignments can be submitted late without consequence. However, it is possible that you won't receive a grade if you submit your peer-graded assignment too late because classmates usually review assignment within three days of the assignment deadline.

Can I re-attempt an assignment?
Yes. If you want to improve your grade, you can always try again. If you’re re-attempting a peer-graded assignment, re-submit your work as soon as you can to make sure there’s enough time for your classmates to review your work. In some cases you may need to wait before re-submitting a programming assignment or quiz. We encourage you to review course material during this delay.

PEER-GRADED ASSIGNMENTS

Peer-graded assignments require you and your classmates to grade each other’s work.

How do peer graded assignments work?
After you submit your work, you’ll be asked to review your classmates’ assignments. To pass, you’ll need to earn a passing grade on your submission and complete the required number of reviews.

How are grades calculated?
You and your classmates will be asked to provide a score for each part of the assignment. Final grades are calculated by combining the median scores you received for each section.

What kind of feedback should I give?
Be respectful, encouraging, and honest. Acknowledge what your classmate did well and offer specific suggestions on how they can improve. Scores should reflect the learner’s understanding of the assignment prompt and points should not be deducted for difficulties with language or differences in opinion.

Is there a penalty for submitting my work late?
No, but it’s important to submit your work as close to the due date as you can. Classmates grade most of the assignments within three days of the due date. If you submit yours too late, there may not be anyone to review your work.

If I fail an assignment, can I try again?
Yes! You’ll can always try again, but you’ll need to resubmit your work as soon as possible to make sure your classmates have enough time to grade your work.

Can I edit my assignment?
Yes, but you’ll need to re-submit your work and any grade you’ve already received will be deleted.

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FAQs
> When will I have access to the lectures and assignments?
As soon as you enroll in a course, you’ll have access to all videos, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer review assignments become available once your session has officially begun. If you choose to explore the course without subscribing by using the audit option, you may not be able to access certain assignments.

> What if I need additional time to complete the course?
Most courses run on sessions that start every 2-4 weeks. Deadlines are suggested to help you stay on track, but if you fall behind, you can simply switch to a later session. Your grades and progress will transfer to the new session with you. There is no limit to the number of sessions you can join, so feel free to take as much time as you need.

> Can I take this course for free?
You can access all videos, readings, and discussions, free of charge. You can also submit assignments and earn a grade for free. If you want to earn a Course Certificate, you can subscribe or apply for financial aid.

>What is the refund policy?
Subscription payments are non-refundable.

>UNIQUE TO THIS COURSE: Can I take this course for free?
Yes, this course is open and fully available for free. Learners will have the option to register for a Coursera certificate for purchase or through financial aid.

How It Works

Coursework
Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies.

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English language learners! Participate in the "English for Media Literacy" MOOC starting October 16! During this FREE, five-week online course, learners will develop and practice English language skills related to different forms of media. Learners will develop critical thinking skills as they read and evaluate different types of media, such as social media, blogs, podcasts, television, film, newspapers, and magazines. Enroll for FREE today, but hurry, enrollment ends October 21! All prospective learners can register by visiting www.tinyurl.com/moocmedia

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